AIDS Prevention Tips For Teens, Detail Info About HIV & AIDS

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AIDS is a condition caused by a virus called HIV that attacks a person’s immune system, making it defenceless against diseases and infections. The full medical name for AIDS is Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and the virus is called the Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

HIV is transmitted through all forms of unprotected sexual intercourse, i.e., vaginal, anal or oral sex without the proper use of a latex condom, and through sharing needles or syringes with someone who is infected with HIV. Because HIV can “hide” in the body for 10 years or more before it shows up as AIDS, you must never assume that just because you cannot “see” it in a person, it is not there!

Do it today–it’s your life.

hiv-aids_3Q&A

Q. Can you get HIV/AIDS from casual contact with an infected person or their stuff?
A. No. HIV/AIDS is not spread through sweat, tears, or saliva. The body fluids that have been shown to contain high concentrations of HIV include blood, semen, vaginal fluid, breast milk, and other body fluids containing blood.

Q. If you already have HIV, does it really matter if you drink or use drugs?
A.Yes. Not using tobacco, alcohol, or drugs improves your chances of staying healthy longer. Use of any of these substances can cause other health problems, interfere with your treatment medications, or both.

Q. Who is most likely to get HIV/ AIDS?
A. Anyone who has unprotected sex, shares a needle, or exchanges blood with an infected person is at risk. HIV is a virus. AIDS is a disease. Viruses do not care about age, race, gender, or sexual orientation.

The bottom line: If you know someone who is risking exposure to HIV/AIDS, urge him or her to stop. If your behavior places you at risk of an HIV/AIDS infection–STOP! If you have already placed yourself at risk, get tested and follow your doctor’s instructions. The longer you ignore the real facts, the more chances you take with your life. Talk to your parents, a doctor, a counselor, a teacher, or another adult you trust. You also can call the CDC National AIDS Hotline at 800-342-2437 for more information.

 

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